The San Francisco Bay Wildlife Society is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) Friends group, authorized by Congress to support the education, interpretation, and research activities of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

The primary mission of the San Francisco Bay Wildlife Society is to promote public awareness and appreciation of the San Francisco Bay and its natural history, and to conserve and preserve the remaining bay lands as essential wildlife habitat.

Join

Become a Supporter of the San Francisco Bay Wildlife Society. Your dues will include a subscription to Tideline and a 15% discount at the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge Bookstore.

Volunteer

Volunteer at the Refuge and gain valuable, rewarding experience. Through nature walks, talks and slide programs, help visitors understand and appreciate the natural and cultural history of the Refuge.

Donate

Your support of our education, interpretation, and research activities is more important than ever. Any amount you’re willing to donate will be greatly appreciated! Donations may be fully tax-deductible.

Tideline

Tideline is a quarterly newsletter published by the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, with funding from San Francisco Bay Wildlife Society.
Summer
2017

From our blogs

A look back at the last 30 years of the San Francisco Bay Wildlife Society

The First Decade 1987 - 1996

 

1987: Donated funds for old Fremont pumphouse restoration, making it an environmental education classroom. Runs bookstore & purchased a copy machine for Refuge.

1988: Bought first computer at Refuge. Established bookstore at Klamath Basin NWR. Began publishing The Tideline. Established Explorer post (Boy Scouts) with emphasis on conservation & natural resources.

1989: Published Drawbridge, A Hand-Me-Down History. Began Exploring The Wilds seminars. Purchased computer and slide projector for EEC. Held first Winter Wildlife Arts & Crafts sale.

1990: Klamath Basin & Sacramento NWRs became part of SFBWS scope. Established bookstore at Sacramento NWR. Funded Summer Art Academy. Published Wetland Wildlife Viewing Guide with funding from several grant. Purchased another computer for Fremont site. Purchased electron microscope for Pumphouse classroom and Bio-Scope for EEC.

1991: Began financial support of NWR Volunteer program.

1992: Purchased a laser printer for Refuge. Part-time environmental education employees hired to keep Alviso EEC open n weekends. Positions funded with grants from the City of San Jose and Santa Clara Valley Urban Runoff Pollution Prevention Program.

1993: Funded Latin American Internship for Hopper Mountain Condor Recovery Program through grant agreement with FWS. Malheur Wildlife Refuge, Oregon, added to SFBWS scope. Purchased a laptop computer for the Refuge.

1994: Hired Program Administrator to support growing needs of 7 programs.

1995: Grant funded up-grade EEC Pavilion & new EEC Butterfly Garden. Santa Clara Valley Urban Runoff Pollution Prevention program expanded to full time position.

1996: Funded EEC Disabled Access Pathway. Published Endangered Species brochure. Purchased a video microscope for Pumphouse, a lamination machine and funded mural in the Fremont Pavilion. Salt Marsh Manual developed as a tool for teacher training for class room visits to the Refuge.

Field Trips and Scout Programs

General Education Program Information

Free field trip programs are offered at two sites at the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge. The San Francisco Bay Wildlife Society, the City of San Jose, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service offer the Living Wetlands program at the Environmental Education Center in Alviso. The Don Edwards Refuge offers Wetland Round-Up field trips at the Refuge Headquarters in Fremont, and at the Environmental Education Center in Alviso.

Upcoming Activities

Activities This Month

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Our Programs
 

Living Wetlands

The Living Wetlands program (previously called Slow the Flow) is a partnership of the City of San Jose, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the San Francisco Bay Wildlife Society.

The purpose of the Living Wetlands program is to raise public awareness about watersheds and water conservation in relation to the salt marshes at the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge. The program aims to raise public awareness about water use issues in an effort to slow the flow of freshwater effluent to the bay’s salt marshes and increase viable habitat for endangered species.

The program includes 15 unique interpretive programs, two to three special events a year, one summer camp, and field trips and classroom presentations for schools, community partners, and nonprofit organizations.

Watershed Watchers

The Watershed Watchers program is a partnership of the Santa Clara Valley Urban Runoff Pollution Prevention Program (SCVURPPP), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the San Francisco Bay Wildlife Society.

The purpose of the Watershed Watchers program and SCVURPPP is to prevent urban runoff pollution (pollution coming from a myriad of sources, such as oils from vehicles, detergents from washing things outside, litter, and pet waste) and increase the surrounding communities’ knowledge of such pollution, and how to reduce its harmful effects through personal behavior.

This purpose is accomplished through many avenues, with the most popular being the interpretive programs offered at the Environmental Education Center.

Seeking Donations for Blue Goose School Bus Transportation Fund

Donations for Blue Goose School Bus Transportation FundThe San Francisco Bay Wildlife Society (Society) is seeking donations to make the Blue Goose School Bus Transportation Fund permanent and sustainable. The Fund pays for buses that enable school field trips to visit the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge as a learning laboratory.

For the last two years, the Fund has enabled school groups to participate in the Wetland Round-up Field Trip (grades K-6) and Living Wetlands (grades 5 – 12) programs at the refuge. These programs actively involve teachers, adult volunteers, and students in investigating the diverse habitats and wildlife of the refuge. Hands-on, small group activities are designed to teach basic ecological concepts and to introduce endangered species, migratory birds, and wetland habitats to the students. The programs are relevant to the appropriate State of California Education Standards.

Drawbridge

Drawbridge in 2011. Photo courtesy Cecilia Craig. Copyright CC-BY-NA 3.0Drawbridge is a ghost town nestled on an island in the salt marshes of south San Francisco Bay. In its heyday around the 1920s, as many as 600 people visited Drawbridge on weekends to enjoy its rustic atmosphere, and to go hunting, fishing, boating and swimming. Some people remember it as a quiet, peaceful town full of nature lovers, while others claim it was a rip-roaring town full of two-fisted rowdies. Over time, residents and visitors abandoned the town. In 1979 Drawbrige saw its last resident move out. Since then, it has become a ghost town and is slowly sinking into the marshlands.

Warning: No Trespassing Allowed! Drawbridge is now part of the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge and is no longer open to the public. It is illegal and unsafe to visit the town. Trespassers on federally-managed land may be penalized with large fines. Drawbridge can be briefly viewed from the Altamont Commuter Express, Capitol Corridor, and Coast Starlight trains. The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts a Drawbridge Van Excursion led by long-time volunteer Ceal Craig on a periodic basis. The tour does not visit the town itself; it only goes to the closest spot from which one can legally view Drawbridge.